Design

The Elemental Workplace

The Elemental Workplace argues for an end to complexity

A new book by London-based workplace change professional Neil Usher makes the case for simplicity over style in planning new people-centred offices

The sentient workplace is a hyper performance work space

Sentient, hospitable and flat-age: the shift from open plan to open work

As a focus on human psychology and behaviour begins to dominate the workplace design discourse, a new report on the future office sets out the forces of change that will remodel workspace to allow people to work at their physical, mental and emotional best

Design can help the ageing population

Taiwan tackles the ageing workforce with show of innovations

As Asian economies wrestle with the need to keep ageing populations economically productive, a travelling exhibition is demonstrating how new design thinking can enhance the experience of working in later life

There is an opportunity to rethink energy infrastructure

Visionary vista: what will the workplace of 2035 look like?

From community incubators to energy backpacks, what would the future office look like if there were no constraints? A competition set up by the British Council for Offices allowed forward thinkers to introduce their most provocative ideas for the workplace of 2035

Graphic design changes how we interact with our environment

Four ways environmental graphics can improve employee experience

From wayfinding and visual communications to improving creativity and mental focus, experiential graphic design can play a critical role in how we interact with our workplace

Switching settings: design pioneer in hacking your own workspace

Forget designing the office as a finished box for workers – start thinking about new ways to let people personalise their own space, says Aleksey Lukyanov-Cherny of SITU Studio

Green sky thinking means that buildings should be never finished

Green Sky Thinking: why work buildings should never be finished

Amid economic turmoil, sustainable initiatives are the first to get the chop. But advocates of new thinking from a green perspective suggest it can provide timeless answers to current property problems

Story line: whatever happened to the narrative workplace?

At the turn of the millennium, storytelling in workplace design was all the rage, as big-bang brandscapes dominated the field. Today, we’re more circumspect about a narrative approach. Why?