Worktech

San Francisco preview: Bay Area embracing new era of automation

This year’s WORKTECH San Francisco will explore the fragile interdependency of man and machine in the workplace and how, if done right, organisations can reap big rewards from automation

Automation in the workplace is often talked about in extreme terms. It is either the silver bullet to workplace efficiency promising vast financial gains, or an apocalyptic disaster set to destroy thousands of jobs. This means automation is usually regarded with fear and scepticism, but this need not be the case.

However, tech-savvy San Francisco is not afraid of changes automation brings to its workplace. This will be evident in the upcoming WORKTECH San Francisco conference on 29 October 2019. The event, held at Mission Bay Conference Centre, aims to demystify the apprehension around automating processes in the workplace and invites keynote speakers such as H. James Wilson of Accenture and Brady Watkins of SoftBank to discuss their experiences of automation in the workplace.

The conference will also explore themes on culture and collaboration, experience and senses and the flexible workplace.

The game changer

It is inevitable that AI will change processes in organisations. In some companies, this is already the case. However, it is the interaction between machine and human that is often the sticking point. As scepticism fades, humans and smart machines will collaborate more closely and work processes will become more fluid and adaptive. This allows organisations to be more dynamic in the face of future change.

While last year’s WORKTECH San Francisco 2018 conference focused on leadership and experience, this year will embrace the beauty of technological capability and the potential it offers for humans. AI is changing the rules on how companies operate – and San Francisco is typically embracing the change head on.

WORKTECH San Francisco 2019 will be held at Mission Bay Conference Centre on 29 October 2019. View the programme and book your ticket here