cities

Utopia or dystopia? How work shapes health in our cities

As our polluted urban centres struggle to be great places to live and work, public health policy is now turning its attention to what happens in the workplace

Networked innovation: from outside in to inside out

Workplace design has increasingly recognised the need to bring the outside in.  Now, successfully connecting to new innovation ecosystems means thinking from the inside out

Bauhaus

Bauhaus at 100: how does its workplace legacy stand up?

As the fountainhead of modern architecture, Germany’s Bauhaus design school controversially provided the visual basis for management efficiency and control. So why do we still revere it today?

Spontaneous, social and green: London lifts the lid on the new workplace

In the search for more innovation and wellbeing in the workplace, could chance encounters and biophilic design be a winning combination? Speakers at WORKTECH London’s 2018 conference suggested how the future might unfold  

Bloomberg London

Why Bloomberg’s London office is in a class of its own

Against all expectation, the top award in British architecture, the RIBA Stirling Prize, has been given to an office block. But this Foster-designed workplace project defies the odds in so many ways

Awe in design has commercial benefits

Can awe-inspiring design features really boost workplace performance?

Spectacular interior design elements were once seen as self-indulgent. Now there is scientific evidence to suggest that inducing a sense of awe can bring commercial benefits

Participatory design helps engagement

Well by design: stop treating people like cogs in a machine

In the debate about better wellbeing solving the productivity crisis, could greater employee participation in workplace design be an answer? A new study suggests it can

Japan in full bloom

Japan’s low growth predicament – and what can be done about it

The inaugural WORKTECH Tokyo conference set out the challenges facing the Japanese workplace – and potential solutions from elsewhere to raise productivity. But could the seeds of Japan’s revival be found in its own past management successes?