Making life easier for teams amid pressures of performance

Helping teams to work together more effectively in a hybrid world of work will be critical to company productivity, says GlaxoSmithKline workplace chief Simon French in an exclusive interview with the Smart Coffee Break, presented by Nestle Coffee Partners

Academy update: a new look and community membership tier

As more workplace professionals turn to online resources in the current crisis, we unveil a new look for the WORKTECH Academy and a new category of community membership

Handle with care: managing people in the post-virus workplace

WORKTECH Wednesday Briefing is a new addition to the Academy’s coverage during the pandemic. In our first video feature, Academy director Jeremy Myerson discusses the potential impact of coronavirus on experience, mental health and leadership at work

Will ‘floworking’ be the fourth age of the financial workplace?

The major changes seen in the financial sector over the past decade are set to develop in new and intriguing ways, according to WORKTECH’s Financial Workplace 19 conference

cities

Utopia or dystopia? How work shapes health in our cities

As our polluted urban centres struggle to be great places to live and work, public health policy is now turning its attention to what happens in the workplace

Spontaneous, social and green: London lifts the lid on the new workplace

In the search for more innovation and wellbeing in the workplace, could chance encounters and biophilic design be a winning combination? Speakers at WORKTECH London’s 2018 conference suggested how the future might unfold  

Awe in design has commercial benefits

Can awe-inspiring design features really boost workplace performance?

Spectacular interior design elements were once seen as self-indulgent. Now there is scientific evidence to suggest that inducing a sense of awe can bring commercial benefits

Participatory design helps engagement

Well by design: stop treating people like cogs in a machine

In the debate about better wellbeing solving the productivity crisis, could greater employee participation in workplace design be an answer? A new study suggests it can