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creativity

future gazing

Facing digital assassination? Innovation predictions for 2020

What’s in store of us in 2020 as technology takes on a growing range of social challenges? UK innovation foundation Nesta has made a series of ten predictions

Wake up and smell the workplace: how aroma is changing behaviour

Offices in the past rarely came up smelling of roses. But all that could be about to change as olfactory design becomes the next sensory stimulus in the workplace. WORKTECH Academy reviews the evidence

How machines really learn

Competing against machines: how AI is changing the future of work

Can machines outperform human intelligence? And what are the consequences for the future of work? Philip Ross busts some fundamental myths about the capabilities of machine learning

creativity innovation

En busca de la creatividad y la innovación

Ya lo dijo Albert Einstein: no podemos pretender que algo cambie si hacemos siempre lo mismo

Creativity and imagination create a new Willy Wonker way of working

The Future of Work – a world of pure imagination?

The world of work is rapidly changing, and digital domination means a shift in the type of work we do and how we do it. Leeson Medhurst of 360 Workplace discusses the transition to a ‘Willy Wonka’ principle of working

What Amazon’s workplace wish list tells us about the future city

As Amazon draws closer to a decision about a new location for its second headquarters in North America, its public declaration of demands has prompted questions about what the future city requires to attract forward-thinking enterprises

Graphic design changes how we interact with our environment

Four ways environmental graphics can improve employee experience

From wayfinding and visual communications to improving creativity and mental focus, experiential graphic design can play a critical role in how we interact with our workplace

Making light work of constant distractions in open plan space

Having trouble getting ‘into flow’ in the office environment? A new traffic light system promising to cut down interruptions has reopened a familiar debate about the trials of working in open plan